Is Going Direct Really Cheaper Than A Broker Or Price Comparison For Small Business Insurance?

The UK media is currently awash with advertising slogans from direct commercial insurance companies targeting small business owners in an attempt to make them switch their provider of business insurance.

‘Get 12 months cover for the price of ten’ and ‘You won’t find us on price comparison websites’ are typical of the slogans emanating from these companies, in a language more akin to the selling of car insurance than the traditional professional and almost stoic approach to the selling of business insurance cover.

In the current recession, price has become the determining factor in winning the war of market share for all goods and services and insurance is no exception. Prudent small businessmen and women are looking to cut costs in all areas of their business and the large direct insurance companies are well aware of this.

The large insurers are also aware that the UK market has over five million small businesses of which a fifth are sole traders, self-employed and people working from home, many of whom are familiar with purchasing their personal insurance direct with the provider, either by phone or on the Internet.

There are three types of provider in the current market for business insurance in the UK.

Intermediaries such as insurance brokers and agents, price comparison sites and direct commercial and business insurers.

Each has their own advantage and disadvantages, however whether one distribution channel is cheaper than another is often a subjective view from a particular trade, or dependent upon factors many of which cannot be quantified in price.

Direct Insurance companies claim to be able to offer cheaper polices because the cut out the costs of the middleman. It is certainly true that direct insurers do not have to pay an intermediary for the cost of the lead or introduction, however it is questionable whether this cost saving is actually reflected in the prices offered to the public.

Certainly there are economies of scale to be made by centralising the life-cycle of a policy from sales point to claim and renewal, however all those functions that are performed by an intermediary still have to be carried out in-house by the direct company and these have a cost.

Many large composite insurers often have distinct direct divisions with their own target market and premium rates. The same company may also have a broker or intermediary division or channel.

It is quite often the case that a large broker with a large book of business of, for example, small builders liability, will receive much more preferential rates then the same companies direct channel, because that insurance company wishes to retain that brokers clients.

Commercial Insurance brokers then are often able to offer preferential rates because they have more flexible schemes and arrangements than the direct channel.

One of the main benefits of using an insurance broker or intermediary in purchasing commercial insurance for small business, cannot be quantified in price and is worth the commission or fee that they may charge. That is advice, market and product information and knowledge, access to various markets such as Lloyds and some human help if the worst happens to a business and a claim is needed.

A commercial or business insurance broker is often able to negotiate far better claims settlements than if an individual were to deal direct with the insurer. The main reason for this is once again the insurer wishes to retain that brokers share of the total risk pool and will often pay out to a broker on an ex-gratia basis. This cost of this service is not quantifiable at the quote stage where small business cover may well just be valued for the price paid or the covers bought.

The third major way in which small business owners can purchase cover is by visiting a price comparison website. All the major UK comparison sites have recently begun to offer online cover aimed particularly at the small business sector, with under 50 employees. This is in direct competition with the direct insurers for television and media advertising space, aimed in particular at self-employed tradesmen and women who require business liability insurance and perhaps commercial van cover.

The comparison price proposition is that they can compare the market or at least a small section of it, to find the cheapest business insurance. They often do not provide any assistance in the purchasing decision-making process and the reality often is, that the cheapest commercial and small business insurance can be found in one of the other distribution channels.

It is therefore important that a small businessman shops around and takes some time to compare offerings including premiums, covers and services from all three sales channels. Prices tend to vary immensely by trade across the direct, broker and comparison markets and often it is a case of finding the provider or supplier who is the industry leader for a particular business type or trade in order to make large savings.

Role Of Business Brokers In Selling A Business

Role of business brokers in selling a business is more important than buying a business. However, there are people who do not understand the importance of the role of business brokers when they decide to sell their business. Irony is that some people are happy with giving more time to the selection of a coffee machine rather than to choosing the right business broker. This is a big mistake on their part and can result in not only the loss of money and time but also sometimes resulting in inability to find any buyers.

Here are some points to consider when you choose the business broker for selling your business. However, it is not possible to get a broker who has all the qualifications yet you must look for experience, knowledge, reliability and compatibility with you.

Reliability:
Reliability is essential because the role of business broker in selling a business is very important. How can you judge whether a particular business is reliable or not? The best method is to contact the references given by the business broker. They are in the best position to tell about how the business broker performed the deal. Ask them whether they are satisfied with the role of business broker or not. Also, make sure that the business broker you are going to hire has the capability of taking the transaction to the end and can follow up.

These references can also give you indications regarding the price they got for selling their business. Could they get the price they were expecting? Also, ask them about the consistency of the business broker with the plan charted out in beginning. They can also tell about the level of knowledge the broker has and his capability of providing the right advice. One very important question that you can ask is if need be would they like to hire the same broker again or not. The answer to this question can help you in taking decision quickly regarding hiring the business broker for selling the business.

If the business broker you are going to hire for selling the business belongs to the association of brokers then this is a point in his favor adding to his reliability. This is because the Associations such as International Business Brokers Association apply very strict ethical rules. Similarly, you can gauge the level of the knowledge by asking some questions. The business broker should not only have completed formal education to perform his job perfectly, but also need to keep himself informed about the changes in the particular industry.

Finally, a tip regarding experience of the business broker you are going to hire. If the business broker has ever owned a business then he is a better choice than the others who never run any business.

Tips to Successfully Sell a Small Business

When you started your business you planned to grow it as a lifetime enterprise. Now, for whatever reason you have decided to sell your business and cash in on all your hard work. Maybe you want to stock up all over again in another field of business or maybe you just want to put up your feet and relax. Since selling a business is normally a once in a lifetime venture, it is unlikely that you would have any prior experience unless you have started or sold several small businesses in the past. Here is some good advice to get you started with selling your small business:

Defining your business sell expectations
In order to conclude a successful sale of your small business you need to plan the sale meticulously and the first step is to define your expectations:

  • Do you want to sell your business for cash or will you accept payment in another form such as stock or debt instruments?
  • What is your price expectation
  • What expectations do you have of the buyer in terms of business continuity and tradition?
  • Do you want to sell out to the public in an IPO or to your employees in a ESOPs scheme?

Timing and financing
It can sometimes take a long time to negotiate and conclude a sale of a business especially if there is complicated tax issues involved. The majority of small business sales involve some form of seller financing such as deferred payments so that you may not see a large lump sum of cash payment up front. Give some thought to the risk and how you would like to structure the small business seller financing.

Valuing the sell of your small business
You would need a detailed and sensible valuation of your business in order to justify the price that you will be asking for it. Decide on the method that you’ll use since methods may vary with the kind of business involved. The judgment on whether you will use asset value, replacement cost, or capitalization of earning or some combination thereof depends largely on your judgment and what a potential buyer will accept.

Re-doing your small business financial statements
As long as you are running your business, how you present your financial situation is largely dictated by tax considerations so as to minimize your tax bill. You will probably need to recast your accounts to show the true earning potential to backup any business valuation that you undertake. Though you should probably be cautious as to whom you show these records and consult an attorney in the process.

Sell small a business with privacy
It’s a good idea to sell your business with concerns for privacy. You should conduct all your sale negotiations in secret and restrict people in the know to as few information as possible. If word gets out that you are selling, you will find key employees leaving the company or being recruited by competitors, you’ll also find suppliers pulling lines of credit. This will simply impair your ability to get a decent price for your small business. The sale of a business usually screams financial troubles, you don’t want the wrong perception to get out in the public about your small business.

Use a competent small business broker
If possible use a competent business broker. Get referrals, shop around, and research. S/he will help you set a realistic price, identify and approach potential buyers in the strictest of confidence. Remember that s/he has a vested interest in getting the highest possible price since their rate for services rely on commissions of the sale.

Selling a business can take time, but due diligence will prove to breed success. One can expect a sale of their business if they’ve took the needed measures to ensure that their small business is aligned in a direction of growth and they are able to prove such statistics.